0

South African Wine

South African Wine

South African Wine South Africa is one of the most prominent wine-producing countries in the Southern Hemisphere. With more than 300 years of winemaking history, it is often described as bridging the gap between the Old World and New. The majority of wines are made using New World winemaking techniques but often have more in common stylistically with their Old World counterparts. South Africa’s wine industry is distributed around the lush, rugged landscape of the Western Cape. Here, the abundance of mountains, valleys and plateaus allow winemakers to produce a diverse range of styles. Vineyards are also found in the Northern Cape’s Orange River region, where the flat, barren landscape is dominated by the Kalahari Desert. Most of South Africa’s wine-producing regions have a Mediterranean climate, significantly influenced by the meeting of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The quintessential South African vineyard The country’s signature variety is Pinotage, a crossing of Pinot Noir and Cinsaut that is rarely found in quantity in any other wine-producing country. Shiraz is widely planted also, as are Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot (often found together in a Bordeaux Blend). Chenin Blanc is the republic’s most-planted grape, and South African Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc have become popular internationally in recent years. The Wine of Origin system, a legal structure introduced in 1972 to acknowledge and protect the diversity of terroir in the country, classifies South Africa into the regions, districts and wards where vineyards are found. Vines were first planted in South Africa by Dutch settlers in the 1650s, although wine production did not really begin to take off until French Huguenots arrived with viticultural skills and knowledge in the 1680s. South Africa’s oldest wine estate is located in Constantia, where the production of the legendary dessert wine Vin de Constance gave the region worldwide fame in the 18th and 19th centuries. Stellenbosch is equally historic as a wine-producing region, the first vineyards having been planted here in the 1690s. The South African wine industry suffered numerous setbacks during the 19th and 20th centuries. A devastating outbreak of phylloxera in the 1860s all but killed off the production of Vin de Constance. Throughout the 20th Century, the South African Co-Operative Wine Growers Association (better known as KWV) restricted the production of wines in such a way that innovation was near-impossible and quantity was prioritized over quality. Its control over the South African wine sector lasted until the 1990s, and even now, the country’s industry is unusual for its high number of co-operatives. South African wine fell out of favor internationally during the 20th Century, reaching an all-time low when trade sanctions were placed on the country in the 1980s due to its apartheid policies. It was Nelson Mandela who helped to reinvigorate the industry: wines from the Rust en Vrede estate in Stellenbosch were served at his 1993 Nobel Peace Prize ceremony dinner in Oslo, Norway. Today, South Africa is the ninth-largest producer of wine in the world, with some 100,000 hectares (250,000 acres) under vine. More than 250,000 people are employed in the industry and South African wine has enjoyed international attention and acclaim for its wide variety of styles. Last updated 12-Aug-2014
south african wine 1

South African Wine

South Africa is one of the most prominent wine-producing countries in the Southern Hemisphere. With more than 300 years of winemaking history, it is often described as bridging the gap between the Old World and New. The majority of wines are made using New World winemaking techniques but often have more in common stylistically with their Old World counterparts. South Africa’s wine industry is distributed around the lush, rugged landscape of the Western Cape. Here, the abundance of mountains, valleys and plateaus allow winemakers to produce a diverse range of styles. Vineyards are also found in the Northern Cape’s Orange River region, where the flat, barren landscape is dominated by the Kalahari Desert. Most of South Africa’s wine-producing regions have a Mediterranean climate, significantly influenced by the meeting of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The quintessential South African vineyard The country’s signature variety is Pinotage, a crossing of Pinot Noir and Cinsaut that is rarely found in quantity in any other wine-producing country. Shiraz is widely planted also, as are Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot (often found together in a Bordeaux Blend). Chenin Blanc is the republic’s most-planted grape, and South African Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc have become popular internationally in recent years. The Wine of Origin system, a legal structure introduced in 1972 to acknowledge and protect the diversity of terroir in the country, classifies South Africa into the regions, districts and wards where vineyards are found. Vines were first planted in South Africa by Dutch settlers in the 1650s, although wine production did not really begin to take off until French Huguenots arrived with viticultural skills and knowledge in the 1680s. South Africa’s oldest wine estate is located in Constantia, where the production of the legendary dessert wine Vin de Constance gave the region worldwide fame in the 18th and 19th centuries. Stellenbosch is equally historic as a wine-producing region, the first vineyards having been planted here in the 1690s. The South African wine industry suffered numerous setbacks during the 19th and 20th centuries. A devastating outbreak of phylloxera in the 1860s all but killed off the production of Vin de Constance. Throughout the 20th Century, the South African Co-Operative Wine Growers Association (better known as KWV) restricted the production of wines in such a way that innovation was near-impossible and quantity was prioritized over quality. Its control over the South African wine sector lasted until the 1990s, and even now, the country’s industry is unusual for its high number of co-operatives. South African wine fell out of favor internationally during the 20th Century, reaching an all-time low when trade sanctions were placed on the country in the 1980s due to its apartheid policies. It was Nelson Mandela who helped to reinvigorate the industry: wines from the Rust en Vrede estate in Stellenbosch were served at his 1993 Nobel Peace Prize ceremony dinner in Oslo, Norway. Today, South Africa is the ninth-largest producer of wine in the world, with some 100,000 hectares (250,000 acres) under vine. More than 250,000 people are employed in the industry and South African wine has enjoyed international attention and acclaim for its wide variety of styles.
south african wine 2

South African Wine

Travel South Africa Discovering the Distinctive White Wines of South Africa Your Illustrated Guide to Pairing Fashion and Wine Set Up Your Party With 10 Wines $10 and Under See more About South Africa South African wines offer impressively good value, and feature styles and tastes that are food friendly, blending elegance and power. South Africa has been producing wine since the first vines were planted in the 17th century, brought by the Dutch governors of Cape Colony. At one time, the sweet wine of Constantia was the most prized in the world.The most important South African wine regions are around the two cities of Stellenbosch and Paarl. A range of wine styles are made, from stunning blockbuster reds to full bodied Chardonnay and crisp, refreshing Sauvignon Blanc. Chenin Blanc, also known as Steen, is the local white workhorse grape capable of making impressive dry and sweet wines. Pinotage, South Africa’s own red grape (a cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault) still leaves wine critics divided, but can make great single-variety offerings as well as being a key component in Cape Blends. Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Bordeaux-style red blends are also among the country’s top reds.We have thousands of South African wine reviews available in our Buying Guide. Search the South African wine guide to browse our South African wine ratings and discover all that this wonderful wine-producing region has to offer.
south african wine 3

Wine competitions are held to assess whether a wine is of good quality and whether it is true to its character. In 2014 more than 20 wine competitions were held in South Africa, many of them concentrating on specific styles or varietals. The only South African wine competition acknowledged as a truly international wine concours is the annual Michelangelo International Wine & Spirits Awards, founded in 1997. The first Michelangelo Liqueur Awards were held in 2014 as part of the wine awards. Only accredited wine judges, wine makers and sommeliers from Europe, USA, Australia and Asia are invited to judge the approximately 1700 South African wines and spirits entered by producers in the Michelangelo International Wine & Spirits Awards (www.michelangeloawards.com). Another South African wine competition, the national Veritas award, was started in 1990. The Top 100 South African Wine Competition is a newer example of a local wine competition.
south african wine 4

About South Africa South African wines offer impressively good value, and feature styles and tastes that are food friendly, blending elegance and power. South Africa has been producing wine since the first vines were planted in the 17th century, brought by the Dutch governors of Cape Colony. At one time, the sweet wine of Constantia was the most prized in the world.The most important South African wine regions are around the two cities of Stellenbosch and Paarl. A range of wine styles are made, from stunning blockbuster reds to full bodied Chardonnay and crisp, refreshing Sauvignon Blanc. Chenin Blanc, also known as Steen, is the local white workhorse grape capable of making impressive dry and sweet wines. Pinotage, South Africa’s own red grape (a cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault) still leaves wine critics divided, but can make great single-variety offerings as well as being a key component in Cape Blends. Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Bordeaux-style red blends are also among the country’s top reds.We have thousands of South African wine reviews available in our Buying Guide. Search the South African wine guide to browse our South African wine ratings and discover all that this wonderful wine-producing region has to offer.

You can download all 4 of South African Wine photo to your computer by right clicking picture and then save image as. Do not forget to share if you like with this picture.

Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *