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Lean To Shed

Lean To Shed

The lean to shed style is one of our most popular designs. Our plans are designed to aid both the beginning builder and the seasoned professional to successfully build a lean to shed. Our plans show detailed information like the location of every board in all the shed walls and shed floor. By using the shed plans and the How To Build a Shed instructions together you will have the informational resources you need to plan, determine costs, and build your shed.
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Lean To Shed

When your shed or other storage building no longer provides enough room, you can add additional storage if you add a lean-to onto a shed. If the existing shed is structurally sound and has an exterior wall to which you can attach your lean-to, adding a lean-to can be a fairly simple project.
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Lean To Shed

Every set of plans comes with How To Build A Shed eBook that walks you through the steps cutting and installing the roof rafters for a lean to shed roof. It also covers all the other aspects of shed building like framing the shed floor, framing the shed walls, installing siding and installing trim.
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Lean To Shed

Calculate the amount of each material you will need, price them, and purchase them. Some basic items that a lean-to addition for a tin shed would use include: Poles for supporting the eave framing. 4″ x 4″ pressure treated southern yellow pine will support a lightweight roof framed with 2″ x 4″ boards, spanning less than 15 feet (4.6 m) or so. For a longer, heavier roof span, 6″ x 6″ timbers or even steel columns may be more suitable. Rafters for framing the actual supporting structure of the roof will need to be strong enough to support the weight of the lathing, the decking and the workmen who will walk on the roof while installing it. A somewhat typical span of less than 10 feet (3.0 m) may be framed with southern yellow pine if the rafters are free of large or loose knots and are otherwise structurally sound. You may use Douglas fir, hemlock, or cedar instead. Lodgepole pine, spruce and other softer pine species are too knotty and not strong enough for roofing unless the rafters are from large diameter trees. For roof spans 10 feet (3.0 m) or greater, 2″ x 6″ nominal framing or larger, should be used. The rafter nailers spanning between the posts on the eave side of your lean-to must be strong enough to support the load of multiple rafters. Use a minimum size of 2″ x 6″ nominal southern yellow pine or other strong wood. Nailers attached directly to the wall of the building onto which the lean-to is being added can be the same size lumber as the rafters themselves as long as the nailer is attached securely to the wall of your building. Local building code and the existing wall material will determine which anchors to use. These may include lag bolts (to attach to large diameter wooden beams), threaded bolt nuts and large diameter washers (drilled into hollow concrete blocks), or hurricane anchors. Lathing strips, or the framing members that lay across the rafters that the metal roofing is attached to should be sound southern yellow pine or a similar lumber. 1″ x 4″ lathing lumber is sufficient to support a normal load on spans where the rafters are located at 24 inch center spacing or less. 2″ x 4″ lumber is easier to fasten to (it bounces less when nails are driven into it), and may not be significantly more expensive than the 1″ x 4″s. If you are laying a plywood “roof decking” directly onto the rafters, then you only need lathing to brace between the rafters or to prevent side-to-side movement by cross-tying them to the bottoms of the rafters. Nails or screws to act as fasteners. Nails should be large enough to penetrate the attached member and the supporting member deeply enough to secure the two pieces. Screws may be used to attach dissimilar materials, such as metal framing, roofing, or siding to wood framing, or even for joining two separate wood members.
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Lean To Shed

Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
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For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers). Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.
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Install any partitions you will use to divide the lean-to’s floorspace into different usable areas. The shed in the photos is 10 feet (3.0 m) wide and 21 feet (6.4 m) long, so a partition was installed to create a 7×10-foot space on one side, and a 14×10-foot space on the other. This partition was created by installing steel stud purlins between one of the outboard support posts and a nailer fastened vertically to the existing shed wall.
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Our larger lean to sheds, 8×8 and larger, come with the option of a home built door or a pre-hung door. The plans are included for the home built door and materials list. Pre-hung doors are available from local home stores, lumber yards or door shops. You can have a door built with options like deadbolts, different jamb thicknesses, door threshold and swing direction. A pre-hung door for your shed also gives you the option of having a door style that is hard to build at home.
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Dig your post holes for the supporting posts. Check the placement before, during, and after you dig. The distance between posts depends on the load of the rafters, roof, and any future snow load. Check your local building code for guidelines. Measure the distance between the wall to which you will fasten the lean-to and the starting corner. You can start by pulling string lines along the planned addition. Use the 3-4-5 rule to confirm the outer corners are square before you dig the holes. If the outer wall is not parallel to the shed, the rafters will be difficult to place.
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A 4x8x3/4″ piece of Oriented Strand Board, O.S.B., fits perfectly for the 4×8 shed floor. With a 4×8 shed you do not need to use tongue and groove floor decking because there is only one piece and it does not connect to other pieces.
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Backfill the post holes with concrete. For best results, mix a “post mix” concrete and pour it into the post hole. Leave the bracing in place for at least 24 hours or until the concrete sets, then remove it. If your lean to is small and your area does not experience strong wind or severe storms, you may be able to backfill the post holes with dirt instead.
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Check all of the fasteners to make sure none were missed during construction. Pay close attention to the screws or nails that attach the roofing components. Also check the siding, if used, and any trim installed on corners or edges. Make sure any metal corners (if you side the lean-to with tin) are rolled or formed in such a way that no sharp edges are exposed.
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Tips Use fasteners designed for the roofing materials you select. For metal roofing (tin), use neoprene washered screws or lead-capped nails designed for this purpose. Use strong fasteners for all structural connections. When nailing 2″ nominal members together where the nails support the load on them, use at least 16d cement-coated nails, and make sure the nails penetrate sufficiently. Many building departments do not regulate small projects like lean-tos as long as the additions are under a minimum square footage area and you have no plans to install any utilities such as electrical and plumbing. Still, you should check with your local agency to confirm. Square, level, and plumb all corners so that you can easily attach siding and roofing materials. Metal roofs of steep enough pitch (as well as satellite dishes) can be sprayed with a quick coating of PAM or similar spray oil before snowfall, and the weight of the snow will cause it to slide right off and not stick. This step can save your project from collapsing under heavy snow. If you draw a small floor plan and take it to your local lumberyard or home improvement store, they may be able to help with doing a take-off of the materials you will need.
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Use fasteners designed for the roofing materials you select. For metal roofing (tin), use neoprene washered screws or lead-capped nails designed for this purpose. Use strong fasteners for all structural connections. When nailing 2″ nominal members together where the nails support the load on them, use at least 16d cement-coated nails, and make sure the nails penetrate sufficiently. Many building departments do not regulate small projects like lean-tos as long as the additions are under a minimum square footage area and you have no plans to install any utilities such as electrical and plumbing. Still, you should check with your local agency to confirm. Square, level, and plumb all corners so that you can easily attach siding and roofing materials. Metal roofs of steep enough pitch (as well as satellite dishes) can be sprayed with a quick coating of PAM or similar spray oil before snowfall, and the weight of the snow will cause it to slide right off and not stick. This step can save your project from collapsing under heavy snow. If you draw a small floor plan and take it to your local lumberyard or home improvement store, they may be able to help with doing a take-off of the materials you will need.

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