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Botanical Gardens Brooklyn

Botanical Gardens Brooklyn

Early plans for Prospect Park called for the park to straddle Flatbush Avenue. The City of Brooklyn purchased the land for this purpose in 1864. When Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux brought their final plans to the city for approval in the 1860s, they had eliminated the problematic division along Flatbush. The northeast portion went unused, serving as an ash dump. Legislation in 1897 as the city moved toward consolidation reserved 39 acres (16 ha) for a botanic garden, and the garden itself was founded in 1910. The garden was initially known as the Institute Park. It was run under the auspices of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, which included (until the 1970s) the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn Children’s Museum, and Brooklyn Academy of Music. It opened as the Brooklyn Botanic Garden on May 13, 1911, with the Native Flora Garden being the first established section.
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Botanical Gardens Brooklyn

Brooklyn Botanic Garden (BBG) is a botanical garden in the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. Founded in 1910, and located in the Prospect Park neighborhood, the 52-acre (21 ha) garden includes a number of specialty “gardens within the Garden”, plant collections and the Steinhardt Conservatory, which houses the C. V. Starr Bonsai Museum, three climate-themed plant pavilions, a white cast-iron and glass aquatic plant house, and an art gallery. The Garden holds over 14,000 taxa of plants and each year has over 900,000 visitors.
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Botanical Gardens Brooklyn

No. But I have seen security dropping people a couple of times, on golf cart. It's a walking around garden to enjoy everything, because you have to be also on the grass to see some of the wonderful trees they have, special plants or flowers. I would advise to call the botanical garden, or go to their website and inquire. By the way it's not a huge botanical garden, but enough to spen a great afternoon, or morning with family, and the Brooklyn Museum is next to it, full of wonderful stuff to see and learn from as well.
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Botanical Gardens Brooklyn

Brooklyn Botanic Garden is a founding partner of the Brooklyn Academy of Science and the Environment (BASE), a small public high school dedicated to science, environmental studies, and urban ecology that was launched in 2003. A Field Studies course is offered adjunct Living Environment for incoming freshmen where students spend two hours out of one day in the week at BBG developing scientific skills and immersed in outdoor scientific study. The school is operated by a partnership between BBG, Prospect Park Alliance, and the New York City Department of Education. Students are also connected with scientists and horticulturists who serve as mentors for advanced research studies students develop. BASE graduated its first class in 2007 and has attained its fourth Gates Millennium Scholar in 2013.
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Botanical Gardens Brooklyn

It’s a beautiful day (so far), and if you’re looking for some weekend plans, you could do worse than heading to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden for a lovely prelude to the Sakura Matsuri festival. These new photographs of beautiful Prunus persica and Prunus subhirtella, not to mention Prunus pendula and Prunus serrulata, bode well for the celebration, which takes place April 29-30.
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Botanical Gardens Brooklyn

In 1927, Walter V. Cranford, a construction engineer whose firm built many of Brooklyn’s subway tunnels, donated $15,000 to BBG for a rose garden. Excavation revealed an old cobblestone road two feet below the surface and tons of glacial rock, which had to be carted away on horse-drawn barges.
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Botanical Gardens Brooklyn

BBG has been producing publications since 1945, when it launched America’s first series of popular gardening handbooks. Today, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Guides to a Greener Planet continue to provide home gardeners with practical information on subjects such as garden design, great plants, and gardening techniques. BBG’s website showcases the Garden and its programs and offers information for the home gardener in popular features such as Garden Botany and Environmental Gardening. New features are added every week, including seasonal interactive guides such as “ID Your Holiday Tree” and “Cherry Watch,” and online resources like the Metropolitan Plant Encyclopedia. BBG’s collection of historic photographs and lantern slides was recently made available online. The website was one of the first to be fully compliant with federal laws requiring information technology to be equally accessible to the disabled.
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Botanical Gardens Brooklyn

A donation from Henry Clay Folger, founder of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. paved the way for the construction of BBG’s original Shakespeare Garden in 1925. Since moved to a different location in the Garden, this English cottage garden exhibits more than 80 plants mentioned in William Shakespeare’s plays and poems. Plant labels give the plants’ common or Shakespearean names, their botanical names, relevant quotations, and, in some cases, a graphic representation of the plant.
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Housed in the McKim, Mead & White Administration Building, the BBG Library provides a collection of books on horticulture and botany that is available to home gardeners, professionals and staff. This building houses a Rare Book Room which holds valuable and historic botanical literature. This building also features classrooms, auditorium, a rotunda and offices.
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Other specialty gardens at BBG include: the Discovery Garden, designed for young children; the Herb Garden; the Lily Pool Terrace, which includes two large display pools of lilies and koi fish and surrounded by annual and perennial borders; the Osborne Garden, a 3-acre (1.2 ha), Italian-style garden that features pergolas and a stone fountain, and the Rock Garden, built around 18 boulders left behind by the glacier during the Ice Age. A Celebrity Path honors famous Brooklynites past and present, such as Barbra Streisand, Woody Allen, and Walt Whitman, with a trail of engraved paving stones. Following along that path leads to the Alfred T. White Amphitheater that hosts mini concerts and performances.

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